Guest Blogger: Organizing Electronic Cords

Guest Blogger: Darla DeMorrow, Certified Professional Organizer ®.

Website: www.HeartWorkOrg.com

Cords are a symptom of modern life, for sure. The more connected you are, the more cords you have. I feel like I am on a mission to control cords. And crumbs, but that’s a different problem. Anyway, do you feel like your cords are well behaved? If not, here is a very satisfying 30-minute project that might save you time in the future. But even if it doesn’t, taming cord clutter can make your home feel more calm.

Gather you favorite cord labeling supplies. You can start simple with masking tape or Washi tape and a ball point pen. I love hook and loop organizers easily found at dollar stores or in any major electronics aisle, which allow you to wrap cords without crimping or twisting. A label maker is sweet for creating neat, easy-to read labels. Surprisingly, plastic bread tabs from your morning toast (see picture) and a permanent marker can also be used to mark cord with a tag.

Got your comfy clothes on? Time to climb under your computer and figure out what goes with what. Label BOTH ENDS of cords to save time when troubleshooting or moving items.

Now, what about small gadgets? I like using a hanging pocket jewelry organizer to label and stash all the current gear, including the ones the ones for the kids.

Gadgets that clutter your counter top for charging can also be labelled and stashed. You can buy a multi-unit charger, or you can DIY your own.

Set your cords apart from others using colorful Washi tape, and show off your personality, too.

Label what is out and what you use, pat yourself on the back for now. This should take you about 30 minutes to label everything that’s laying out and in frequent use.

If you have a box of unidentified chargers and wires, that is a project for another day. It may take some time to locate those older players, games, recorders, phones and such. Bag them up, label them with a note that says, “Last reviewed (today’s date)” and pack them away. If you don’t use them in 6 months or a year, you might be able to part with them easily. If, however, you already to recycle them, you can drop them off at the recycle boxes found at Best Buy stores. You do NOT need to turn in cords and phones together for them to be recycled.

Which approach will you take to organize electronic cords at home?


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